opulentes:

WRITER LIFE

Inspiration and Writer’s Block

MUSIC

SOFTWARE AND TOOLS

Research Organization

Family Trees

Editing

Writing 

Timeline Makers

FORUMS, BOARDS, COMMUNITIES 

WRITING BLOGS

RESEARCH 

Culture

Terminology

Mental Illness

Crime

Survival

Self-Defence And Fighting

Death

Body Language

GENERATORS 

Names

Plots

Prompts

NOVELS

 ROMANCE

Sex

Kissing

WORLD BUILDING

PLOT

CHARACTERS

How To

Archetypes 

Depth

Questionnaires

Names

EDITING AND REVISION

Reference Materials

How To

Synonyms

Editing Services

Grammar

PUBLISHING

Self-Publishing

Agents

Software

Querying

Literary Magazines

Publishing

ACADEMIC

General

Introductions

Body Paragraphs

Topic Sentences

Conclusions

Thesis Statements

Citing

Argumentative Essays

Writing About Poetry

Expository Essays

Research Papers

College Application Essays

Narrative Essays

thehamsteroflife:

h-o-r-n-g-r-y:

di-stressing:

it’s a shame the original caption for this is gone bc it was a really nice story. An author decided he wanted his 2000-ish word essay tattooed onto people, but only one word per person, if someone was to die, the story would be gone.

It’s kind of amazing to think, imagine being that author and having a story that could never be read, yet it could be anywhere in the world. idk man I just think it’s pretty incredible.

"Shelley Jackson’s Skin project, a 2095-word story published exclusively in tattoos, one word each on as many willing volunteers, so it can never be read in its proper order, but just exists, pulsing, out in the world at all times."

do you realize what this is saying?
you are part of a big story.
if you were gone, the whole story would have something missing.
this is great.

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

image

BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

image

AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

image

AND STILL MORE

image

image

SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

image

PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

elumish:

  1. Leftover inconveniences (braces, casts, etc.)
  2. Renewable energy
  3. Creative attempts at fuel
  4. Cooperation
  5. Warlords
  6. Increased infant mortality
  7. Change in hierarchy (laborers more important than white-collar workers, etc.)
  8. New governmental structures
  9. Mercenary groups
  10. Formation of…
fuckyourwritinghabits:

emptymanuscript:

aetherial:

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers
As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.


This is something I have always encouraged people to consider when writing. If you can afford it, and you have one in your area - TAKE A BODY LANGUAGE CLASS.  It will open your eyes to a whole new world of subtleties you never knew existed. SO worth it as a “Real Life” skill and for all those times when you’re writing and you need your character to react nonverbally.

There is also, in addition to these others, the writer resource book: The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

This is how you show, not tell what your character is feeling.
fuckyourwritinghabits:

emptymanuscript:

aetherial:

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers
As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.


This is something I have always encouraged people to consider when writing. If you can afford it, and you have one in your area - TAKE A BODY LANGUAGE CLASS.  It will open your eyes to a whole new world of subtleties you never knew existed. SO worth it as a “Real Life” skill and for all those times when you’re writing and you need your character to react nonverbally.

There is also, in addition to these others, the writer resource book: The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

This is how you show, not tell what your character is feeling.

fuckyourwritinghabits:

emptymanuscript:

aetherial:

theinformationdump:

Body Language Cheat Sheet for Writers

As described by Selnick’s article:

Author and doctor of clinical psychology Carolyn Kaufman has released a one-page body language cheat sheet of psychological “tells” (PDF link) fiction writers can use to dress their characters.

This is something I have always encouraged people to consider when writing. If you can afford it, and you have one in your area - TAKE A BODY LANGUAGE CLASS.  It will open your eyes to a whole new world of subtleties you never knew existed. SO worth it as a “Real Life” skill and for all those times when you’re writing and you need your character to react nonverbally.

There is also, in addition to these others, the writer resource book: The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

This is how you show, not tell what your character is feeling.

Anonymous Asked
QuestionSo i just started uni and I joined the university's newspaper. I'm thinking of doing a book review column! Can you give me any advice? I have to submit my first review this week!! Answer

thebooker:

That’s amazing! I’m so happy for you. :)

  • Be honest
  • Draw readers in with the first sentence. I normally sum up the book and/or my feelings for it
  • Explain the book’s plot briefly. Give away just enough to let people know what it’s about without spoiling it for them
  • Try to address a number of aspects of the book, including things like writing (style, format, pace), characters (development, protagonist, likeability, relationships), setting and plot
  • Use paragraphs when you talk about a different aspect of the book. It adds a nice flow to your writing and makes it more appealing to your reader, rather than a block of text that’s all over the place
  • Talk about what you liked and disliked, whether you loved the book or hated it. Be constructive
  • Mention who you would recommend the book to - include examples of similiar titles/authors or a genre/style
  • Don’t ramble for the sake of a long review. Be concise in the points you make
  • (This helps me anyway) Take notes before you write your review and plan what you want to say. This way you can be organised and not forget anything
  • If you have any control over the formatting, be sure to make the review visually appealing. Add an image of its cover art, use bold and colour to enhance certain parts of the text, etc.
  • Write in the style that’s natural to you, while still writing a formal and well-written review
  • Be sure to proof read and comb through it for errors, to avoiding those sneaky little typos

writing-questions-answered:

badromancenovelquotes:

ninja-gus:

heyfunniest:

im done

For my author and editor friends…

Oh, god, we really need more illustrations of bad quotes.

Please.

(Source: iraffiruse)